Interview with Wajahat Husain, June 29, 2005

Project: Sites of Disturbance: Oral History and Memories of Partition Oral History Project

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Interview Summary

Hussain talks about the time that he spent in the Pakistan Army under General Douglas Gracey during a situation in which Gracey supposedly refused a direct order from Mohammad Ali Jinnah to send troops to the Kashmir front because he felt Jinnah was a representative of the British crown. He then talks about a book by Alan Campbell-Johnson called ?Mission with Mountbatten,? which Gracey felt did not accurately describe the situation. Hussain then goes on to describe the reality of the situation according to General Gracey, who claims he did not send troops because he was advised against it due to a troop shortage. He then talks about the role of the Indian National Army (INA) in Kashmir (India).

Hussain talks about the Baramulla Incident that occurred in October of 1947 in which tribal leaders lost control of their soldiers and they looted and burned the town, as well as raped nuns. He also talks about the effect that the tribal incursion had on the perception of the issue of Kashmir (India). Husain talks about General Douglas Gracey?s personal views about the conflict in Kashmir (India). He then talks about the escalation of tensions in Kashmir (India) in 1947. He then talks about the effect that being quickly embroiled in a conflict so soon after independence had on Pakistan. Hussain then describes the commanders of the Indian National Army, all of whom were British. He then describes the logistical difficulties that plagued the Pakistan Army during the conflict. Hussain tells a story in which General Loftus-Tottenham ordered him to man the telephones while he went to play polo, requiring him to stall chief commander Roy Bucher?s request for a ceasefire. Hussain describes the pressing issues facing Pakistan after the Indo-Pakistan War of 1947, such as issues with the economy and settling refugees. He then talks about the reasons why he served in the Pakistan Army. Hussain also describes the importance of his faith. Hussain describes that he has no regrets about joining the Pakistan Army. He then talks about what being Pakistani means to him. Hussain also talks about whether or not he believes the military and government will ever be separate in Pakistan. Finally, he talks about the difference between military law and martial law.

Interview Accession

2016oh293_site022

Interviewee Name

Wajahat Husain

Interviewer Name

Amber Abbas

Interview Date

2005-06-29

Interview Rights

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Husain, Wajahat Interview by Amber Abbas. 29 Jun. 2005. Lexington, KY: Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.

Husain, W. (2005, June 29). Interview by A. Abbas. Sites of Disturbance: Oral History and Memories of Partition Oral History Project. Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries, Lexington.

Husain, Wajahat, interview by Amber Abbas. June 29, 2005, Sites of Disturbance: Oral History and Memories of Partition Oral History Project, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.





Persistent Link for this Record: https://kentuckyoralhistory.org/ark:/16417/xt7tmp4vmm5x