Interview with Angus Gordon, January 28, 1976

Project: University of Kentucky Oral History Project

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Interview Summary

Angus N. Gordon begins this interview by discussing the problems with the honor system at the University of Kentucky while he was a student, where cheating was known to be wide-spread. Gordon recalls he had little time to participate in social activities, but was a member of the Union Philosophical and Literary Society as well as the Patterson Literary Society. Gordon talks about being a member of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) just prior to World War I. He talks about the uncertainties expressed by the students regarding going to war.

Gordon discusses the relationship between the university, the student body, and the Lexington, Kentucky community. He mentions an issue when a student disappeared, possibly during a fraternity hazing incident. It was rumored that the student was killed, but nothing was ever proven, and the student was never found. Gordon discusses the library, which he thought was "more than adequate," but was probably used more for "courting and dating than for studying". Students were not allowed to check out books until around 1931, so they would get a card for the public library. He mentions Dr. Frank L. McVey and Frances Jewell McVey. He remembers that athletics played a large role on campus, especially football. Centre College was their biggest opponent. He talks about the fire in Dean F. Paul Anderson's office, which destroyed the records of several players accused of being ineligible to play.

Gordon mentions that several politicians came to speak on campus, including William Jennings Bryan during the Scopes trial. He recalls that Teddy Roosevelt and then Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke downtown at the train station. Gordon asked Roosevelt whether a student trained in both agriculture and ROTC should volunteer for service, an issue which was a continuous debate on campus. Roosevelt responded that agriculturally trained students should remain at home to farm. Gordon remembers that faculty positions were limited for women, but they were allowed to participate in the Home Economics Department under Miss Mary E. Sweeney. He recalls that roles were more traditional for both men and women during this time.

Interview Accession

1976oh011_af021

Interviewee Name

Angus Gordon

Interviewer Name

Terry L. Birdwhistell

Interview Date

1976-01-28

Interview Rights

All rights to the interviews, including but not restricted to legal title, copyrights and literary property rights, have been transferred to the University of Kentucky Libraries.

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Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries.

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Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries.

All rights to the interviews, including but not restricted to legal title, copyrights and literary property rights, have been transferred to the University of Kentucky Libraries.

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Gordon, Angus Interview by Terry L. Birdwhistell. 28 Jan. 1976. Lexington, KY: Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.

Gordon, A. (1976, January 28). Interview by T. L. Birdwhistell. University of Kentucky Oral History Project. Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries, Lexington.

Gordon, Angus, interview by Terry L. Birdwhistell. January 28, 1976, University of Kentucky Oral History Project, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.





Persistent Link for this Record: https://kentuckyoralhistory.org/ark:/16417/xt78cz324v8w