Interview with Robert L. Milby, August 20, 1982

Project: John Sherman Cooper Oral History Project

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Interview Summary

Robert Milby, an active participant in Kentucky Republican Party political campaigns on the precinct level, begins the interview by detailing his personal background. Milby remembers John Sherman Cooper as an excellent campaigner. Milby was with Cooper during all of his political races in Kentucky. Milby characterizes good and bad times on the campaign trail. The interviewee generalizes about Kentucky Republicans and their tendencies. Thruston Morton's campaigning style is compared to that of Cooper. Cooper's 1948 Senatorial campaign is recalled. Milby then characterizes politics in Lexington during the 1940s and 1950s. Additionally, the 1952 Republican National Convention is detailed. Milby also compares Cooper's 1948 campaign to his 1952 campaign, both for Senate. Fayette County Republicans and their perception of Cooper is shared. Milby briefly talks of the 1952 Congressional election in Kentucky between Leslie Henderson and John Watts. The interviewee recalls his experiences as a Kentucky Republican candidate in a race for a seat in the House of Representatives in 1952. The 1954 Senate race between Cooper and Alben Barkley is explored. Notably, President Eisenhower and Vice President Nixon both came to Kentucky to endorse Cooper. Cooper's 1956 Senatorial campaign is evaluated. Cooper's interactions with Happy Chandler are briefly mentioned. Milby talks of the Kentucky Republican Party in the 1950s. Additionally, the 1960 presidential election from a Republican viewpoint is examined. The interviewee provides his opinion on the Nunn brothers. Milby reflects upon his experiences at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. Coopers' 1966 Senatorial campaign is detailed. Milby assesses Kentucky Republican politics in the 1960s. Milby also explains how his political views have changed over the years. Lorraine Cooper is discussed, as well as why Cooper was popular among female voters. Milby characterizes Cooper and his personality. Potential people to interview for the project are offered. To conclude the interview, Milby remarks upon Cooper's frequent tardiness for events.

Interview Accession

1982oh126_coop047

Interviewee Name

Robert L. Milby

Interviewer Name

Terry L. Birdwhistell

Interview Date

1982-08-20

Interview Rights

All rights to the interviews, including but not restricted to legal title, copyrights and literary property rights, have been transferred to the University of Kentucky Libraries.

Interview Usage

Interviews may be reproduced with permission from Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Special Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries.

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Milby, Robert L. Interview by Terry L. Birdwhistell. 20 Aug. 1982. Lexington, KY: Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.

Milby, R.L. (1982, August 20). Interview by T. L. Birdwhistell. John Sherman Cooper Oral History Project. Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries, Lexington.

Milby, Robert L., interview by Terry L. Birdwhistell. August 20, 1982, John Sherman Cooper Oral History Project, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries.





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Persistent Link for this Record: https://kentuckyoralhistory.org/ark:/16417/xt7sf7666w7d